Science of Skin

Photoprotection describes the act of protecting against light and in particular ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Ultraviolet radiation is emitted by light sources, most commonly from the sun and sun beds, and can be broken up into three regions based on their wavelength: UVA, UVB, and UVC. UVC is absorbed by the atmosphere before it reaches the Earth's surface and poses no risk to life. UVA and UVB both reach the Earth's surface and may cause skin damage, such as accelerated skin ageing (photoaging) and, more importantly, may induce DNA mutations leading…
Solid organ transplantation refers to the removal of living and functioning organs from a donor’s body and then their transfer back into a recipient’s body. Solid organ transplantation involves major surgery and the risk for serious complications, including death. In 2008 in the United States, about 200,000 people were living with a functioning transplanted organ, or graft, while about 100,750 were waiting on the active national transplant list and around 25,100 solid organ transplantations had been performed. In Australia, there were 799 organ transplant recipients in 2009, with 4,285 individuals…
Certain skin cancers can be directly attributed to chronic skin damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation, while other skin cancers (such as melanoma) are also believed to be the contributed to by this damage. The best way to reduce your risk of skin cancer is to adhere to a regular regime of skin photoprotection (protection from UV and light) before skin is exposed to UV light. Sunburn is only one indicator of skin damage from ultraviolet light, caused by UVB light (in the range of 310-280 nm). More recently we have…
The most important source of light and subsequent energy on earth is the sun. The sun emits energy that can be absorbed by organisms and molecules where it facilitates countless reactions, including photosynthesis, ozone production, vitamin D, and weather phenomena. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) Sunburn and skin cancer are known to be correlated to the dose of UV radiation our skin encounters. UV radiation is emitted by the sun, and is a region in the electromagnetic spectrum between 400-200nm, that can be broken down into three categories: UVA which is between…
Vitamin D is the name given to a group of prehormones (secosteroids) essential in small quantity for healthy bodily function. Vitamin D is responsible for maintaining healthy bone structure and its deficiency has been implicated as playing a role in a number of chronic diseases and cancers. There are two mains types of vitamin D which can be absorbed by the human body. The first, vitamin D3 (or cholecalciferol), is produced in the skin of humans upon exposure to direct sunlight. The other, vitamin D2 (or ergocalciferol), is found naturally…
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