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Childrens' Skin

Acne - by far the most common skin condition affecting teenagers, read more about acne and how to treat it here. Athlete’s foot (Tinea pedis) - an infection of the feet with a dermatophyte fungus; these thrive in warm, moist environments. The fungal infection, which is usually mild, occurs most commonly in young men. Symptoms of athlete’s foot are spongy, irritated or peeling skin. Sometimes the skin splits (fissure), has a pungent odour or becomes further infected with bacteria. Wearing tight footwear, not changing socks regularly, sharing towels or being barefoot in communal facilities, such as bathrooms or swimming pools, can all enhance the spread and growth of fungi. Particularly susceptible are those who have poor circulation, sweat a lot…
The single most common skin disease in teenagers, acne (acne vulgaris) occurs when the skin pores become clogged with excess sebum (oil), dirt and dead skin cells. Bacterial infection can then lead to further inflammation of the skin and the eruption of red, inflamed pimples. The skin condition is also commonly characterised by whiteheads and blackheads. As many as 95% of males and 85% of females suffer from some form of acne during adolescence. Although the physical effects of acne are usually only cosmetic, the condition can have a highly detrimental effect on a young person’s psychological well-being. Causes The surface of the skin contains pores, each of which opens into a canal called a follicle. Each follicle contains a…
With adolescence comes an increase in both independence and responsibility. Where their parents were once fully accountable, teens now begin to make many of their own choices regarding lifestyle and health care. Along with a greater sense of self-awareness comes the desire by many young adults to alter their appearance or express themselves through various forms of physical alteration and adornment; many such practices affect the skin. Guidance from trusted adults can help teenagers make the best decisions concerning their skin care and general well-being. Smoking, alcohol and skin It is during their late teens that many people are exposed to alcohol and tobacco for the first time. While both cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption impact widely on the body,…
When it comes to nutrition, our skin often reflects what’s going on inside our body. Feeding children a balanced diet, high in essential vitamins and minerals, can have beneficial effects on the health of their skin. The following is a list of skin-friendly foods and the nutrients that they contain. FOOD NUTRIENT Berries (blueberries, cranberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries), plums, apples, green tea, artichokes, spinach, beans/legumes (black red and pinto), prunes, raisins, pecans. These foods are all rich sources of antioxidants. Reactive oxygen species, or ROS, are molecules produced by the body in response to things like sun exposure and pollutants. When present in large amounts they can cause damage to both the structure and genetic information of skin cells. Antioxidants…
As a parent, you want to ensure that your child is given prompt, good-quality health care; this includes looking after their skin. At times, talking to a paediatrician or dermatologist can be confusing, or even awkward. There are some things you can do to improve these conversations and make certain you are getting the most of their expertise. This article describes some tips to help you and your child get the best care from your dermatologist. Before the appointment Some people find it useful to prepare prior to the appointment. It may help to write out a list covering the following details and take it to the appointment with you. The reason for your appointment and any symptoms the patient…
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